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huskihl

Muh fingers look really big
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So, anyway...back to the original topic...

660 vs 395 for milling: is it generally accepted the 395 is better for milling? Is the stock oiler good enough on both saws for a 42" bar without an aux oiler?
395 is typically considered better for milling. The outboard clutch keeps heat further away from the motor and the oiler pumps about double what a 660 does. A 42 is probably borderline for an auxiliary oiler on the 395
 

gurwald

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I run a 42" bar on my 394 milling, its not drenched in oil but I see no wear or excessive chain stretch. I make sure its well lubed before I start each cut. I am considering making som auxoiler setup.
 

Lnk

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Believing in a “God” or some some other deity is not a requisite for any of the qualities you list. It appears you are prejudging all people and rejecting all those who do not share your views as inferior and unworthy. Seems pretty narrow minded…
I don't see where he was calling out anybody on anything, just that he has found a lack of those qualities in those he has met first hand. We are all free to associate with those who share our beliefs. Just as you say nobody should waste time milling with a chainsaw when their is a better way. I understood what you meant, and I understand what he means. Not picking someone who doesn't believe what you do or don't believe is counterproductive. The golden rule is a good rule.

Use it or don't, try adding to the conversation instead of subtracting. Sorry if I offended you.

Larry
 

Sagebrush33

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I don't see where he was calling out anybody on anything, just that he has found a lack of those qualities in those he has met first hand. We are all free to associate with those who share our beliefs. Just as you say nobody should waste time milling with a chainsaw when their is a better way. I understood what you meant, and I understand what he means. Not picking someone who doesn't believe what you do or don't believe is counterproductive. The golden rule is a good rule.

Use it or don't, try adding to the conversation instead of subtracting. Sorry if I offended you.

Larry
This just need s to be let ago.
We can all agree to disagree and be good with it.
 

huskyhank

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The 395 is first pick. And you want an auxiliary oiler for what ever saw you pick - it will make a big difference because you are oiling both ends. Chain tension is right when its loose enough to run freely but still gives a smooth cut. A real loose chain will give a more ragged cut. I keep mine tight enough to not have any tendency to jump off.

Biggest thing for smooth cuts is a continuous feed. You want the saw to be pulling under a load that is steady and the saw is pulling down in the meat of the torque band. No change in feel or sound, just a steady long pull.

Get a copy of the Will Maloof book. Its now old and refers to what are now almost antique saws but all the other parts are still valid.
 

DCSCO

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Are you going to be making 32' long slabs? :eek:
A 32’ ladder gives me a 16’ section to maintain a straight edge. I’d take a 40’ if I can find one. I need 16’ length beams.

what do you use for a straight edge? I was also considering 1.5” unistrut channel, but a ladder is lighter.
 

JB-PlantHeirloom

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Having a bunch of cheap thin plastic wedges to put into the kerf will help when making long 16 foot boards, especially when you are getting ready to exit the log, so the saw does not push the board off. Plus, they give you a finger grip to pick up the slab, even if it is to angle it and slide it off.
 

Ketchup

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I find 42” is about the limit for 395 and 660 doesn’t handle it very well. If you plan on doing a lot with a 42” then a 120cc saw will struggle a lot less.
 

Lnk

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I find 42” is about the limit for 395 and 660 doesn’t handle it very well. If you plan on doing a lot with a 42” then a 120cc saw will struggle a lot less.
Is that hardwood or softwood? Just curious as most of my milling is softwood. Pine, red cedar.
 

Ethobling

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Is that hardwood or softwood? Just curious as most of my milling is softwood. Pine, red cedar.
Probably hardwood, because my 462 handles a 36" bar in pine pretty well, so I find it hard to believe a 395/660 would struggle with a 42" in soft wood.
 
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Ketchup

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Is that hardwood or softwood? Just curious as most of my milling is softwood. Pine, red cedar.

Hardwood, but keep in mind there’s more going on than just how easily the saw bogs. The main thing is the clutch overheating and then transferring that heat through the bearings and crank. Stihls have inboard clutches that catch more oil and hold more heat. They also have nylon races in the bearings and a smaller diameter crank. A big outboard clutch designed for lower RPM is a good thing.

Green conifers are certainly a lot easier to mill. For saw and operator.
 

MSaw

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I would LOVE a 3120, but I simply don't have the cash, especially not $2k+ just for the power head.

Any thoughts on the G888? Would a 395 be good enough? (I'm milling almost exclusively pine and nothing over 36" wide.)

Also, what mods would make a saw a better milling saw?
 

MSaw

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The 3120 is not a good saw. I am a husqvarna fan and I could write a whole report to support this statement but not here. Mill saws are about the hardest worked, I would not advise any 'performance' mods to try to make a smaller saw something it isn't.
 

Moparmyway

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The 3120 is not a good saw. I am a husqvarna fan and I could write a whole report to support this statement but not here. Mill saws are about the hardest worked, I would not advise any 'performance' mods to try to make a smaller saw something it isn't.
I’m not sure what you’re trying to say here, I’ve been using my ported 3120 to mill 40” white oak with a 50” bar on a 48” Alaskan with an auxiliary oiler. I’ve also used my ported 394’s & 395’s in the same wood and the 3120 runs circles around any 90cc saw on the mill.

Muffler, timing, carb, ports, cylinders all modded ……… they all do better with mods.

Mayhaps you can elaborate and we can help you out with what seems to be giving you a dim outlook on these saws ?
 
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