High Quality Chainsaw Bars Husqvarna Toys

huskyhank

Super OPE Member
Local time
9:42 AM
User ID
11447
Joined
Jan 12, 2020
Messages
115
Reaction score
260
Location
TN
Country flag
Mostly whatever gets the heat out. The same things will make it run better too. Easiest and cheapest is a muffler mod and re-tuning.
 

gurwald

Pinnacle OPE Member
Local time
4:42 PM
User ID
9417
Joined
May 7, 2019
Messages
291
Reaction score
1,202
Location
Sweden
Country flag
Tune it rich, keep the cooling fins clean, let it idle between cuts, most important is dont force it.
Chainsaw milling shouldnt be very hard on you, if it is most likely something is not working right, alignment issues, dull chain, worn bar, etc.
 

Ethobling

Jack of Many Trades
Local time
10:42 AM
User ID
24428
Joined
Jul 30, 2022
Messages
46
Reaction score
50
Location
North Carolina
Country flag
Gotcha. I'm running 40:1 and keep everything (especially the clutch brake area) free of pitch and clean.

What is a good muffler to throw on my 462 in the mean time? I know WCS makes one, but I seem to remember someone making one with smaller holes, but ended up working better than WCS's for keeping the chainsaw cooler...
 

gurwald

Pinnacle OPE Member
Local time
4:42 PM
User ID
9417
Joined
May 7, 2019
Messages
291
Reaction score
1,202
Location
Sweden
Country flag
No idea, a barkbox maybe, I know you want the exhausts to exit away from you and the log when milling, to the left wich will be up when milling works fine, thats opposite to most stock mufflers that shoots out to the right.
They are fairly easy to modify, I usually buy a new aftermarket one to cut up or just weld a pipe or rivet/screw/weld a new deflecter on and gut the internals.
 

Guido Salvage

Supreme saw hoeder
Local time
10:42 AM
User ID
679
Joined
Jan 26, 2016
Messages
2,078
Reaction score
7,003
Location
Farmville, VA
Country flag
* You get to run a chainsaw
* It's more versatile
* You get to do some physical labor
* It's cheap and you can get 4-5 boards from one slab

Unless you are going to start a lumberyard I dont see why you would get a bandsaw.

Chain saw mills are inefficient, in addition to the loss of material they are also time intensive. Why would I want to spend all day slaving over a hot and loud chain saw when I could produce the same amount of product (with less loss and a better finish) in an hour? It is always better to have the proper tool for the job.
 

Ethobling

Jack of Many Trades
Local time
10:42 AM
User ID
24428
Joined
Jul 30, 2022
Messages
46
Reaction score
50
Location
North Carolina
Country flag
Chain saw mills are inefficient, in addition to the loss of material they are also time intensive. Why would I want to spend all day slaving over a hot and loud chain saw when I could produce the same amount of product (with less loss and a better finish) in an hour? It is always better to have the proper tool for the job.
I get that, but for my purposes, it makes much more sense to have a chainsaw mill. I won't be doing it for a living and the logs will be all over the place on various hill slopes.
 

gurwald

Pinnacle OPE Member
Local time
4:42 PM
User ID
9417
Joined
May 7, 2019
Messages
291
Reaction score
1,202
Location
Sweden
Country flag
Chain saw mills are inefficient, in addition to the loss of material they are also time intensive. Why would I want to spend all day slaving over a hot and loud chain saw when I could produce the same amount of product (with less loss and a better finish) in an hour? It is always better to have the proper tool for the job.

Dont know but I dont have those problems. I enjoy chainsaw milling.
 

ammoaddict

Pinnacle OPE Member
Local time
10:42 AM
User ID
4713
Joined
Nov 29, 2017
Messages
1,371
Reaction score
4,913
Location
NC
Country flag
I
Hey folks. Hope you are well.

I have a question, but first, a small amount of info on where I'm at...

Recently, I purchased an Alaskan Sawmill (36") and a 462 for milling my own lumber. I didn't want to shell out the cash for a bandsaw sawmill, especially seeing how many are on backorder for many months. Also, I wanted to have something dual purpose and easy to move around, so a chainsaw mill fit the bill.

I am running the 462 stock. 40:1 mix using Stihl premium oil and 89 octane ethanol-free gas. 25" bar or my 36" bar if necessary (I realize this is significantly larger than recommended, but it is working fine so far). Only milled pine, so far.

My question: I am big on planning for the future. I expect this 462 to last a few years (especially with good maintenance), but I am considering buying a new, probably bigger saw and using the 462 more as a felling saw.

Which saw should I get? Brand doesn't really matter to me. I have all 3 brands (Echo CS400, Husky 440, Stihl 194t, 029, 462) and like them all, even if the 440 is kinda meh. I'm considering the Husky 395 and the Stihl 661.

I value durability over everything else. With that, parts availability for the foreseeable future is also a big factor.

I've read rumors that Stihl is focusing more on power to weight ratios instead of durability, but it's probably just rumors.

With that said, I am seriously considering Holtzfforma's 395, 660, or 888. The price point is appealing and (since I'm fairly new to chainsaw porting, tuning, etc) could allow me to experiment and learn without worrying about blowing up a $1200+ saw. It could also give me experience taking apart a saw and replacing piston/etc. I currently only have a basic level of saw maintenance, including replacing air filters, fuel filter, spark plugs, etc.

Thanks in advance!
I find a chainsaw mill gives me more liberty to do what I want. I can go where a bandsaw mill can't. It also means if I have a customer who will allow me to mill the tree I take down for them, I don't need to tow behind a big trailer. On top of that, I don't have to position the log (much) onto the sawmill. I can start working right where it's at.

Another huge benefit was already mentioned: dual purpose. I can use the same saw I used to fell a tree to start milling it 10 minutes later.

Question: what do y'all recommend to extend the life of a chainsaw used for milling? Opened up muffler? What else?

I just noticed you are in North Carolina. What part?
 

ammoaddict

Pinnacle OPE Member
Local time
10:42 AM
User ID
4713
Joined
Nov 29, 2017
Messages
1,371
Reaction score
4,913
Location
NC
Country flag
Not sure why it quoted like that. This site has been acting very weird lately for me.
 

huskyhank

Super OPE Member
Local time
9:42 AM
User ID
11447
Joined
Jan 12, 2020
Messages
115
Reaction score
260
Location
TN
Country flag
Chain saw mills are inefficient, in addition to the loss of material they are also time intensive. Why would I want to spend all day slaving over a hot and loud chain saw when I could produce the same amount of product (with less loss and a better finish) in an hour? It is always better to have the proper tool for the job.

Huge reason is lack of ability to move the log. Once it is sawn you can pick it up and carry it board by board. Another is cost. You have a saw and then buy a mill attachment for it. Suddenly you can make boards!
 

Guido Salvage

Supreme saw hoeder
Local time
10:42 AM
User ID
679
Joined
Jan 26, 2016
Messages
2,078
Reaction score
7,003
Location
Farmville, VA
Country flag
Huge reason is lack of ability to move the log. Once it is sawn you can pick it up and carry it board by board. Another is cost. You have a saw and then buy a mill attachment for it. Suddenly you can make boards!


That is why I have tractors, a forklift and a track loader. Why would I want to make a job harder than it needs to be?
 

ammoaddict

Pinnacle OPE Member
Local time
10:42 AM
User ID
4713
Joined
Nov 29, 2017
Messages
1,371
Reaction score
4,913
Location
NC
Country flag
Where are you?

I'm in Granite Falls, Caldwell county. It's north of Hickory, close to Lenoir. In the foothills about 30 minutes south of Boone. So probably around 4.5 hours from you.
 

kneedeepinsaws

Pinnacle OPE Member
GoldMember
Local time
8:42 AM
User ID
12933
Joined
Jun 21, 2020
Messages
805
Reaction score
1,712
Location
Oil Country
Country flag
I have done a crapload of milling over the past few years
My observations are

A band saw will be easier in every way to make large amounts of accurate lumber
However for a chainsaw like you said it’s dual purpose..
the heavier the saw the harder it is on your body milling. Lifting up onto your cut sucks’ I utilize the smallest saw for the cut.
If your making boards that are only 12” wide, get yourself a mini mill that doesn’t have the addition bar support. Using this with a 70cc saw is much much easier on your body and faster in every way with a 20” bar
For wood that is thicker your will need the full mill and a 36” bar to utilize the full mill. If this is the case minimum 95cc but preferred 120cc.
The 3120 will dump oil like no one’s business for killing keeping your chain sharper longer as it won’t get as hot.
If I were say making a house on a piece of property I would def invest in a band saw and a small bobcat or skid to lift logs onto.

for the hobbyists such as myself an atv and some rigging gear along with an alaaskan mill sized for the log including power head is a fun way to make lumber.
 

Ethobling

Jack of Many Trades
Local time
10:42 AM
User ID
24428
Joined
Jul 30, 2022
Messages
46
Reaction score
50
Location
North Carolina
Country flag
I'm in Granite Falls, Caldwell county. It's north of Hickory, close to Lenoir. In the foothills about 30 minutes south of Boone. So probably around 4.5 hours from you.

Beautiful up there, I'm sure! Never went past Ashville (Biltmore Estate), but one day I want to hit the Blue Ridge Parkway...one day...when I have the time, lol. (Been saying that for years)

I have done a crapload of milling over the past few years
My observations are

A band saw will be easier in every way to make large amounts of accurate lumber
However for a chainsaw like you said it’s dual purpose..
the heavier the saw the harder it is on your body milling. Lifting up onto your cut sucks’ I utilize the smallest saw for the cut.
If your making boards that are only 12” wide, get yourself a mini mill that doesn’t have the addition bar support. Using this with a 70cc saw is much much easier on your body and faster in every way with a 20” bar
For wood that is thicker your will need the full mill and a 36” bar to utilize the full mill. If this is the case minimum 95cc but preferred 120cc.
The 3120 will dump oil like no one’s business for killing keeping your chain sharper longer as it won’t get as hot.
If I were say making a house on a piece of property I would def invest in a band saw and a small bobcat or skid to lift logs onto.

for the hobbyists such as myself an atv and some rigging gear along with an alaaskan mill sized for the log including power head is a fun way to make lumber.

Gotcha. How good does the 395 oil? Is there an oiler upgrade available if it doesn't oil enough?
 

Lnk

Here For The Long Haul!
GoldMember
Local time
10:42 AM
User ID
19702
Joined
Oct 12, 2021
Messages
5,159
Reaction score
26,338
Location
East, TN
Country flag
Beautiful up there, I'm sure! Never went past Ashville (Biltmore Estate), but one day I want to hit the Blue Ridge Parkway...one day...when I have the time, lol. (Been saying that for years)



Gotcha. How good does the 395 oil? Is there an oiler upgrade available if it doesn't oil enough?
My 2094 will oil a 36 " bar more than it needs. I would think up to about a 50" bar. Somewhere between the two anyway. My biggest is a 42" I think it may oil that one more than it needs. I think they were going to name the 395 the Exxon Valdez, but that was taken.
 
Top