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Four Paws

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I would like to buy a mill and start chainsaw milling. Most of the trees I have access to are under 30". I have NEVER run into anything over 48"

That said I was thinking about a 36" mill and then buying or making larger rails if necessary. Conversely, I could buy a 48, and buy/make smaller rails if there would be a benefit I am not aware of. Ultimately, I would like to have various rail lengths to suit the size wood I am cutting.

For you guys that have milled, or actively mill, any advice on brand/model of mill and size?

Thanks, Josh
 

huskihl

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I have a granberg 36". I don't use it much, but it works very well
 

mdavlee

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You can adjust the mill in to any size you want. If you want to cut 36" you have to go bigger than a 36" mill. My 30" gives me 27" inside the uprights. I had a 56" mill and sold it when there wasn't any trees that big. Now I have a tree 35" and need bigger rails again. :( Granberg is lighter than a Panther Pro mill. The extra weight on that side doesn't really bother you once it's all the way in the wood.
 

fearofpavement

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I haven't milled all that much but mine is a 24" (needs a 30" bar) and it has worked for what I needed.
 

Four Paws

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Thanks for the feedback, guys.

I am planning to use a 2095 on the mill.

Thinking about getting a 24" mill to start...then as I progress and gain experience, I can get longer rails, and move into larger trees.

Unfortunately we only have softwoods in my area - aspen, maple, pine, fir, cottonwood. There is some juniper around...never cut it before, but some juniper I have looked at are gnarled and crooked and might make for an interesting project.

Right now, I would like to saw up some fir mantles with a live edge, some aspen to turn into paneling, and rip some lodgepole to turn into fencing.

I have no equipment to handle the logs, so I am limited to what I can cut onsite and carry with the help of a few friends.

How are you, Jon?
 
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