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Log Wizard/ bar-mounted debarker questions

Firewood Hoarder

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Hey everyone!

I tried searching for a thread on this topic, but I came up nearly empty-handed after searching so I decided to create a thread on it.

I would like the opinions of those who have used a Log Wizard or other bar-mounted log debarking tool. My father has a bandsaw mill and was attempting to pick my brain this morning about them, what they require, and what they are like to use.

I have a few questions I am hoping someone can answer

"How much saw do you really need to run it effectively"

"How effective are they at clearing off the bark"

"How hard are they on the saw"

"How hard are they on the operator"

I hope someone out there has some firsthand experience with them. I would like to hear from you.
 

Woodslasher

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Hey everyone!

I tried searching for a thread on this topic, but I came up nearly empty-handed after searching so I decided to create a thread on it.

I would like the opinions of those who have used a Log Wizard or other bar-mounted log debarking tool. My father has a bandsaw mill and was attempting to pick my brain this morning about them, what they require, and what they are like to use.

I have a few questions I am hoping someone can answer

"How much saw do you really need to run it effectively"

"How effective are they at clearing off the bark"

"How hard are they on the saw"

"How hard are they on the operator"

I hope someone out there has some firsthand experience with them. I would like to hear from you.
I happen to have a friend that uses one in his cabin business, all these answers are based off conversations with him:

He's used a MS361 on it for 5 or so years, he says it's a bit heavy for it but it works pretty good.

Works pretty good, but I seem to recall him saying it was either tedious or strenuous.

Meh, 5 years and counting out of a standard carb saw, and maintenance has probably been pretty basic/infrequent.

He says the 361 is too heavy for it and he'd rather have a smaller powerhead on it to make it easier on him, but his sons have no issues slinging around a 60cc saw hooked up to it.
 

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I happen to have a friend that uses one in his cabin business, all these answers are based off conversations with him:

He's used a MS361 on it for 5 or so years, he says it's a bit heavy for it but it works pretty good.

Works pretty good, but I seem to recall him saying it was either tedious or strenuous.

Meh, 5 years and counting out of a standard carb saw, and maintenance has probably been pretty basic/infrequent.

He says the 361 is too heavy for it and he'd rather have a smaller powerhead on it to make it easier on him, but his sons have no issues slinging around a 60cc saw hooked up to it.

I have two different poweheads I could adapt to run one at this time. I have that 021 carcass I picked up from you last year, which wouldn't take a whole lot to bring back. I also have an 026 I could finish rebuilding and leave stock (I was going to try my hand at porting it).

My concerns on the 021 are that it wouldn't be powerful enough. And I don't know that I want to give away the 026 to Dad so he can beat the snot out of it (I love him dearly, but 45 years as a mechanic and he doesn't always take care of his own stuff).
 

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Hey everyone!

I tried searching for a thread on this topic, but I came up nearly empty-handed after searching so I decided to create a thread on it.

I would like the opinions of those who have used a Log Wizard or other bar-mounted log debarking tool. My father has a bandsaw mill and was attempting to pick my brain this morning about them, what they require, and what they are like to use.

I have a few questions I am hoping someone can answer

"How much saw do you really need to run it effectively"

"How effective are they at clearing off the bark"

"How hard are they on the saw"

"How hard are they on the operator"

I hope someone out there has some firsthand experience with them. I would like to hear from you.
I have a log wizard that I use to prep dirty logs for the mill....

To answer your questions:

I run it on an 026 that runs like poop....have also ran in on an echo cs400 which actually works better than the 026.
For cleaning logs, I think 50cc is probably best, though a stout 40cc saw works fine.

It works pretty well removing bark, though hardwood bark is pretty slow going....and stringy bark like cedar does just what you'd imagine it would do....gets all wrapped up on the thing.

Stiff AV is a must because it's heavy and really puts a lot of strain on the av parts.
It makes tons of fine dust, so a saw with good air filtration is very important (the 026 is very bad in that dept.)


For me it's a major left elbow killer....and it's kinda got a mind of it's own....takes some getting used to to be able to drive it effectively.
If you use in on small diameter logs on the ground it's also murder on your back.

It's not perfect, but I think it's still a very good tool to have at the sawmill.

If you can find a bark spud, and the bark is "spud-able" that's a better method.

Here's a link to the only full size spud I've been able to find.




Peavy makes a small short-handled spud, but I'm not a fan of the shorties.

Dixie industries used to build an excellent spud.... if you can find a used one, buy it!
 

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I have a log wizard that I use to prep dirty logs for the mill....

To answer your questions:

I run it on an 026 that runs like poop....have also ran in on an echo cs400 which actually works better than the 026.
For cleaning logs, I think 50cc is probably best, though a stout 40cc saw works fine.

It works pretty well removing bark, though hardwood bark is pretty slow going....and stringy bark like cedar does just what you'd imagine it would do....gets all wrapped up on the thing.

Stiff AV is a must because it's heavy and really puts a lot of strain on the av parts.
It makes tons of fine dust, so a saw with good air filtration is very important (the 026 is very bad in that dept.)


For me it's a major left elbow killer....and it's kinda got a mind of it's own....takes some getting used to to be able to drive it effectively.
If you use in on small diameter logs on the ground it's also murder on your back.

It's not perfect, but I think it's still a very good tool to have at the sawmill.

If you can find a bark spud, and the bark is "spud-able" that's a better method.

Here's a link to the only full size spud I've been able to find.




Peavy makes a small short-handled spud, but I'm not a fan of the shorties.

Dixie industries used to build an excellent spud.... if you can find a used one, buy it!


Thank you!

I will show the bark spud to my father when I see him next. Knowing him, he will probably get to welding and fabricate something very similar to what the link shows. If the bark is "spudable" as you put it, that would certainly be faster and less of a mess.
 

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20240223_122844.jpg

Well, I ended up finding a cheap 026 locally that needed minimal work to put right. $60 was too good of a deal to pass up.

I plan to post updates once the log wizard arrives and we get it up and running.

My dad likes the spud idea, but still insisted on having a saw-powered log-debarker.
 

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What I found not to do is use an low kickback chain to drive it. The bumper link seems to reach the bark and interfere.
 

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Makes it easier to operate by getting the weight up close.
Makes sense to me! Less weight to swing, and that weight is removed at the bar end, where it works against you. Have you had any trouble with the chain tracking into the groove?
 

Sawdust Man

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Makes sense to me! Less weight to swing, and that weight is removed at the bar end, where it works against you. Have you had any trouble with the chain tracking into the groove?
It kinda does it's own thing, but never binds or falls off so I don't worry about it.
The biggest issue with the chain is it stretching, I'd go with whatever chain is least likely to stretch.
 

CountryBoy19

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My MS170 handles mine just fine, no lack of power. The issue is if your logs are in the ground you need a longer bar or you'll be bending over a lot and your back will let you know about it.

I'm normally debarking cedar and locust for fence posts so I can easily elevate them. I cut an old bar short and run mine that way. Short bar on the MS170 works quite well at reducing fatigue.
 

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how does it hold up to dirt? are they blades sharpenable?
The blades are disposable, but they are sharp on two both edges so you get to use em twice.

It holds up to dirt okayish..... like a chainsaw, if you can work it so the dirt isn't being pulled through the cut they stay sharp longer.
 

Firewood Hoarder

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I'd imagine that the blades could be sharpened once or twice, seeing as they are like a planer blade, just shorter. Will have to see when I get to that point.
 
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