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Best saw chain for dirty wood / bucking in the landing?

B&BLogging

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So I'm sure that I'm going to get various replies about all different types of chain. Everyone has their own opinions on which saw chain is the best, and those opinions are exactly what I want to hear. Lately I've been going through too many chains, it's the Oregon full chisel lgx chain, 3/8 .50 gauge, the "new, so called, x-grind" stuff. I know full chisel isn't really meant for dirty wood but I've never had this much trouble with a full chisel chain in the landing. It's not due to hitting the ground either, although I'll admit, chit happens, I think it's just from the slight dirt on the logs from skidding. Usually I have a dedicated saw that just stays in the landing so that's why I am looking for a chain just for landing use, something that works good in dirty conditions, bucking logs and something that holds a good edge between sharpening and also requires less of it. Also the chain I'm using now seems harder to file for some reason and the cutter wears down to nothing unusually quick. Has anyone experienced that also? Would a semi skip chain be better? Maybe I should use semi chisel in the landing? What do you all recommend?

Thanks in advance guys.
 
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woodchipper95

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I just touch a few chains up through out the night about 5 or so when one is dull I switch out. Takes about 30 minutes a night. Any chain will dull and need sharpened. I have most brands and most models... really no huge difference.
 

Gunn

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Landing saws will get some extra mileage from running semi chisel.
 

woodchipper95

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When bucking dirty wood on alanding, I've seen some use 404. Dull is still dull whatever chain is used.
Plunge cuts can midigate the damage.
I thought plunge cut was common knowledge when you see obvious dirt in/on the bark. This tip is probably the number one answer to keeping any chain sharp.:aplastao:
 

Hedgerow

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If all it's gonna do is length cut at the landing, I second the .404 suggestion. Or third it.
Them big teef are A. Durable as hell and B. real fast to put an edge back on. C. there's also a lot of sharpenings in one of those big teeth.
 

Homelite410

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Anyone been less than satisfied with lpx lately? Mine won't hold an edge worth a hoot.
 

darkimpulse

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Been using LPX as well, just should have stuck with the LGX I was using as I am not seeing a difference in wear/staying sharp between the two.
 

Hedgerow

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Yes, no, nobody cares.....
Actually I got into a bad loop too Mike.
It's .325. Not lasting well at all, but seems to get to a certain level of dullnes and hang in there a while.
But the loop on the little Makita is LPX and holds an edge about normal.
 

Philbert

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Chipper chain was the way to go for really dirty wood, but I understand that it is only made for harvester bars now. Semi-chisel is next.

Oregon sells some of their chains in a 'MultiCut' form, which means that it has a double thick layer of chrome on the top and side plates. Won't help if you hit a rock, but supposed to help under 'abrasive conditions, like cutting railroad ties.

You could always try a loop of carbide, or STIHL Duro chain, just to say that you did.

Philbert
 

madhatte

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Because of where I work, I cut a lot of wood with bullets in it. Semi-chisel lasts way longer, in my experience.
 
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