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Echo 7310 vs Husky 572 vs Stihl 462

Woodsman

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Hi, I'm looking for a new or used saw in the 60cc - 70cc range and I've narrowed it down to either the Echo 7310, Husky 572 or Stihl's 460, 461, 462. I'm looking for a saw that is very reliable/durable and low maintenance.

Between the saws listed above, which have tended to be more reliable/durable with lower maintenance and any fuel efficiency differences between them?

I've owned an older used Stihl 039 that is on it's last legs and I'm looking for a newer slightly more powerful saw.

I live off grid, in a northern cold weather climate. I have two wood stoves, one to heat my home and the other to heat my kitchen stove. I need enough wood to heat my home and stove for at least 7 months out of the year so I do a lot of cutting. I also cut wood with my neighbors, we're in the woods often looking for large fallen trees to cut for fire wood. We put our saws through a lot of work.
 
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wap13

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What redline said. And all will be a step or 2 up from your 039. If you really are off grid (not doubting you but that can mean different things to different people) and your life depends on staying warm I'd have to have 2 saws just in case you are snowed in and one goes down.
 

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What redline said. And all will be a step or 2 up from your 039. If you really are off grid (not doubting you but that can mean different things to different people) and your life depends on staying warm I'd have to have 2 saws just in case you are snowed in and one goes down.
Agreed, 100%. A lot of city folk have migrated into my neighborhood recently who consider themselves "off grid" simply because they have enough space to grow a garden and raise a half-dozen chickens. The reality is, we haven't been "snowed in" here in ten years, we heat with natural gas and I could walk to McDonald's in less than an hour.

With that being said, I recently bought a 462 Stihl that meets all the criteria you describe, yet for some odd reason it hasn't grown on me, and it tends to sit unused until it's a necessity.
 
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HumBurner

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Hi, I'm looking for a new or used saw in the 60cc - 70cc range and I've narrowed it down to either the Echo 7310, Husky 572 or Stihl's 460, 461, 462. I'm looking for a saw that is very reliable/durable and low maintenance.

Between the saws listed above, which have tended to be more reliable/durable with lower maintenance and any fuel efficiency differences between them?

I've owned an older used Stihl 039 that is on it's last legs and I'm looking for a newer slightly more powerful saw.

I live off grid, in a northern cold weather climate. I have two wood stoves, one to heat my home and the other to heat my kitchen stove. I need enough wood to heat my home and stove for at least 7 months out of the year so I do a lot of cutting. I also cut wood with my neighbors, we're in the woods often looking for large fallen trees to cut for fire wood. We put our saws through a lot of work.

What size wood? Hardwood or softwood?

I was not impressed with the 572, but maybe it's just me. I'd rather have a 562, 372, or 390.
 

davidwyby

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I can’t comment on the echo.

I agree with huskihl.

Huskies are cheaper simpler easier to work on and order parts for. I’d get two 372s so you pretty much always have one running.

Or, get a 461 if you want to do just one saw, and if the wood is bigger. My 461 has a couple more ccs and grunt than my 372s, and it’s tougher.
 

sawmikaze

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I can’t comment on the echo.

I agree with huskihl.

Huskies are cheaper simpler easier to work on and order parts for. I’d get two 372s so you pretty much always have one running.

Or, get a 461 if you want to do just one saw, and if the wood is bigger. My 461 has a couple more ccs and grunt than my 372s, and it’s tougher.

A 462 is stupid easy to take apart and work on. I'm not a fraction of the saw mechanic some of these guys are and I can have the carb off it in about 90 seconds.
 

Canadian farm boy

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If you’re in the bush and you need absolute reliability, I would get a 372 or a 460/461 and not have to depend on the electronics always working in the newer stuff
This^^^ and I will add that dealer support should also play a part in your decision. Plus if you’re cutting that amount of wood you’re likely cutting wood year round regardless of weather conditions so I’d also recommend looking a unit with heated handles. Your hands will thanks you
 

davidwyby

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A 462 is stupid easy to take apart and work on. I'm not a fraction of the saw mechanic some of these guys are and I can have the carb off it in about 90 seconds.
I forgot to mention that I have rebuilt huskies from all the way down to pieces and back but my experience with working on stihls is very limited. Parted one or two out. Maybe it’s the way some people’s brains are wired or what they’re used to but I find the huskies intuitive to work on and the stihls just odd/different. Could probably be gotten used to. Doesn’t matter a whole lot to me since I have backup saws and help available…and they don’t seem to need much work anyway. 😁
 

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For total reliability and if you’re ok with a bit of wrenching, the Stihl 460/1 for the win here. Find a good one that’s gone through by someone who stands by their work and knows what they are doing.

Proven reliability that’s already exceeded the manufacturers claims. They were built in the days before defined obsolescence was not factored in as much as it is now.

You may burn a bit more fuel, but you’ll be happy. Use 32:1 and keep on the fatter side. Saw should last you forever. Quite a jump in power over your 039 as well.
 

Woodsman

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What size wood? Hardwood or softwood?

I was not impressed with the 572, but maybe it's just me. I'd rather have a 562, 372, or 390.
I was in New England for years, still have family around and now in Wyoming.

New England trees: Sugar Maple, Black Gum, Sycamore, Red Pine, Balsam Fir.

Wyoming trees: Bur Oak, Colorado Spruce, Aspen trees, Cottonwood, Douglas Fir, Ponderosa Pine.

Also, if I choose to get one of the saws above ported will it compromise durability/reliability? Does porting effect fuel efficiency? I'm not looking for a competition saw.
 

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Only problem with buying a 460/461 is your buying used unless you get lucky, which buying used is an educated guess.
I’ve heard a lot of guys talk good about the 462 locally.
CFB ported my 044 and it’s a way better saw, way more nuts across the board, as for longevity I don’t know I only have 10-12 gallons through it, I’d imagine any saws listed stock will be a huge step up from a clapped 039 regardless
 

2000ssm6

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You will want a work saw/woods ported. They will use more fuel but cut faster and run cooler, never heard of one not lasting as long as a stock saw. The only issue I see if you are not used to tuning a carb saw, you may want to go with a mtronic or autotune. Getting the tune right on a ported saw with a standard carb will make a big difference in how long it lasts.

Once you run a ported saw, by a good builder, you won't want to touch a stock saw again. Plenty of good builders here..

I know a 372, 460 and 461 respond well to porting, can't speak on the others.
 

Arcticmiller

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Hi, I'm looking for a new or used saw in the 60cc - 70cc range and I've narrowed it down to either the Echo 7310, Husky 572 or Stihl's 460, 461, 462. I'm looking for a saw that is very reliable/durable and low maintenance.

Between the saws listed above, which have tended to be more reliable/durable with lower maintenance and any fuel efficiency differences between them?

I've owned an older used Stihl 039 that is on it's last legs and I'm looking for a newer slightly more powerful saw.

I live off grid, in a northern cold weather climate. I have two wood stoves, one to heat my home and the other to heat my kitchen stove. I need enough wood to heat my home and stove for at least 7 months out of the year so I do a lot of cutting. I also cut wood with my neighbors, we're in the woods often looking for large fallen trees to cut for fire wood. We put our saws through a lot of work.
I love stihl, it’s what I grew up around and have saws pushing 25-30 years old that are still ticking along cutting firewood. (Cut a lot less now, but I used to cut 10+ cord per year. Sometimes a lot more, sometimes a bit less). Bought my first husky (a 572) and am surprised how much I like it. Its slim and compact feeling more so than a 462 I think.

If you cut in the winter-and have big hands I feel like the 462 probably has more hand room between the kickback safety and the bar than the husky, to me the 572 clearance feels a little too tight for winter use with thick gloves at -20 or colder. Other than that I can’t think of anything major. Personally I dislike the chain tensioning assembly being on the side cover. So many years with stihl I prefer that system. But it’s just my personal preference.
 
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