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Another stupid "what saw should I buy" thread

jetsam

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I'm a firewood cutter who gets his own trees. I don't sell any wood. That translates to around 4-5 cords a year.

I've been running a Dolmar 6400 and a little Echo limbing saw for... 8 or 9 years now.

It's time to retire the Dolmar. The parts are outrageous, and getting harder to find. The Echo is getting up there in age, but at least I can get parts for that one.

My new saw needs to be able to pull a chain around at least a 27" bar, have parts that are both obtainable (looking at you, Dolmar) and cost less than a new saw (looking at you, Stihl). I'd like to keep it over 65cc and under $1000 if I can. I grind my own chains, and I don't need extra displacement to compensate for dull cutters. I also don't want to deal with any company that railroads you into their dealers to get parts (looking at you again, Stihl).

Right now I'm kind of thinking an Echo CS-680 (and also eyeballing the CS-7310, even though it's on the high end of my price range). I don't really know how big the difference between the Echo homeowner saws and the Echo pro saws is. Husky's 372XP is also in that range, and that seems like a saw I could work with.

I'm assuming that almost everything in the range I'm looking at is going to have some kind of an auto-tuning carb. I've been adjusting carbs for a while, and would just as soon skip that feature unless it actually works as advertised.

Appreciate any thoughts! :)
 
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bradb123

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I'm a firewood cutter who gets his own trees. I don't sell any wood. That translates to around 4-5 cords a year.

I've been running a Dolmar 6400 and a little Echo limbing saw for... 8 or 9 years now.

It's time to retire the Dolmar. The parts are outrageous, and getting harder to find. The Echo is getting up there in age, but at least I can get parts for that one.

My new saw needs to be able to pull a chain around at least a 27" bar, have parts that are both obtainable (looking at you, Dolmar) and cost less than a new saw (looking at you, Stihl). I'd like to keep it over 65cc and under $1000 if I can. I grind my own chains, and I don't need extra displacement to compensate for dull cutters. I also don't want to deal with any company that railroads you into their dealers to get parts (looking at you again, Stihl).

Right now I'm kind of thinking an Echo CS-680 (and also eyeballing the CS-7310, even though it's on the high end of my price range). I don't really know how big the difference between the Echo homeowner saws and the Echo pro saws is. Husky's 372XP is also in that range, and that seems like a saw I could work with.

I'm assuming that almost everything in the range I'm looking at is going to have some kind of an auto-tuning carb. I've been adjusting carbs for a while, and would just as soon skip that feature unless it actually works as advertised.

Appreciate any thoughts! :)
You might want to look into a Husqvarna 572xp . Bruce's sale is still going on and the price is great for a 70cc saw! I have four of them and a fifth one on the way . The auto tune on the the 572 has been flawless for me. They will pull a long bar very well!
 

Wilhelm

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Nothing I can help with!
Dolmar parts ARE increasingly more tedious to source even for me, and I don't care about Stihl OPE.
Still , thank You for thinking of me when it comes to Dolmar. :)

The OP actually already has a very clear idea what he wants and what he doesn't.
Echo or Husqvarna , whichever he chooses I wish him good luck! :beer-toast1:

Dolmar for life! :cool:

D92420E2-DB85-4362-A596-C8B55F375260.jpeg
 

jetsam

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I would keep the 6400 going and run it one of the best saws made. What is wrong with the 6400?

I was in love with the 6400 for a long time. She still runs strong and always starts on the second pull once you know her preferences. My main complaint right now is that the muffler assembly is broken and only has a couple remaining screw-holes. The new part is $250, and I would rather drop $1000 for a new saw than spend $250 for a frigging muffler. I bought this saw partly because it looked future-proof (if the head develops issues, it's an easy jug swap to the 7900), but when Makita killed Dolmar, that drove the price of everything up through the roof to the point that I don't see that happening anymore.

My personal preference would be to just patch up the old one, but the gear for welding stainless is also more expensive than a new saw.

Right now I'm having to tighten up the surviving bolts several times per wood trip to keep the muffler attached.

How dumb is it to retire a perfectly good saw over a muffler? :( But here we are.
 

Shane¹

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Really sucks that Makita killed dolmar but before I retired that saw I would look around for a used muffler someone has to have a good one. I got a couple but are open cans I bet someone has one kicking around even saw a new one on ebay for $119
Screenshot_20230924-185232.png
 

jetsam

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Really sucks that Makita killed dolmar but before I retired that saw I would look around for a used muffler someone has to have a good one. I got a couple but are open cans I bet someone has one kicking around even saw a new one on ebay for $119
View attachment 390943

Man, that is tempting at that price.

On the other hand, I'm sinking $120 into a saw that parts aren't ever going to be made for again. Next time I need a part, what is that going to look like?

I hate to say it since they're such great saws, but I'm looking to get away from Dolmar before the parts market escalates even more.
 

Shane¹

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Not that much goes wrong on a 6400 and as far as I can tell most parts are still obtainable if you research and look around. How is the echo dealer support in your area? I have heard a lot of people like the echos but what is parts availability on those?
 

Stump Shot

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I'm a firewood cutter who gets his own trees. I don't sell any wood. That translates to around 4-5 cords a year.

I've been running a Dolmar 6400 and a little Echo limbing saw for... 8 or 9 years now.

It's time to retire the Dolmar. The parts are outrageous, and getting harder to find. The Echo is getting up there in age, but at least I can get parts for that one.

My new saw needs to be able to pull a chain around at least a 27" bar, have parts that are both obtainable (looking at you, Dolmar) and cost less than a new saw (looking at you, Stihl). I'd like to keep it over 65cc and under $1000 if I can. I grind my own chains, and I don't need extra displacement to compensate for dull cutters. I also don't want to deal with any company that railroads you into their dealers to get parts (looking at you again, Stihl).

Right now I'm kind of thinking an Echo CS-680 (and also eyeballing the CS-7310, even though it's on the high end of my price range). I don't really know how big the difference between the Echo homeowner saws and the Echo pro saws is. Husky's 372XP is also in that range, and that seems like a saw I could work with.

I'm assuming that almost everything in the range I'm looking at is going to have some kind of an auto-tuning carb. I've been adjusting carbs for a while, and would just as soon skip that feature unless it actually works as advertised.

Appreciate any thoughts! :)
I believe I would throw a 565 into the mix of possibilities for you. ;)
 

mrxlh

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I was in love with the 6400 for a long time. She still runs strong and always starts on the second pull once you know her preferences. My main complaint right now is that the muffler assembly is broken and only has a couple remaining screw-holes. The new part is $250, and I would rather drop $1000 for a new saw than spend $250 for a frigging muffler. I bought this saw partly because it looked future-proof (if the head develops issues, it's an easy jug swap to the 7900), but when Makita killed Dolmar, that drove the price of everything up through the roof to the point that I don't see that happening anymore.

My personal preference would be to just patch up the old one, but the gear for welding stainless is also more expensive than a new saw.

Right now I'm having to tighten up the surviving bolts several times per wood trip to keep the muffler attached.

How dumb is it to retire a perfectly good saw over a muffler? :( But here we are.
Post in the For Sale section, someone has a 6400 Dolly muffler that they will part with.
 

mrxlh

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I'm a firewood cutter who gets his own trees. I don't sell any wood. That translates to around 4-5 cords a year.

I've been running a Dolmar 6400 and a little Echo limbing saw for... 8 or 9 years now.

It's time to retire the Dolmar. The parts are outrageous, and getting harder to find. The Echo is getting up there in age, but at least I can get parts for that one.

My new saw needs to be able to pull a chain around at least a 27" bar, have parts that are both obtainable (looking at you, Dolmar) and cost less than a new saw (looking at you, Stihl). I'd like to keep it over 65cc and under $1000 if I can. I grind my own chains, and I don't need extra displacement to compensate for dull cutters. I also don't want to deal with any company that railroads you into their dealers to get parts (looking at you again, Stihl).

Right now I'm kind of thinking an Echo CS-680 (and also eyeballing the CS-7310, even though it's on the high end of my price range). I don't really know how big the difference between the Echo homeowner saws and the Echo pro saws is. Husky's 372XP is also in that range, and that seems like a saw I could work with.

I'm assuming that almost everything in the range I'm looking at is going to have some kind of an auto-tuning carb. I've been adjusting carbs for a while, and would just as soon skip that feature unless it actually works as advertised.

Appreciate any thoughts! :)
You can get a brandy new 7900 for under $1k. Parts are in the same situation, but a new 7900 should last a firewooder a long long time.

If I were trying to stay super simple, 272XP and snag a new top end for a spare. Everything else on that chassis is super supported by aftermarket and the quality is really good. I don’t have to warranty what I do for myself, the aftermarket crank seals, fuel lines, av mounts etc are excellent value at less than half the cost of OEM.

I have a 266SE, 268XP, and a 272XP and those will be the last saws I ever sell. I have about 5-6 builders of this chassis, and other than 266 top covers and 266/268 top ends (272 are still available) every other part is still new OEM available.

I would venture to say all the reputable builders here could put you a nice 266/68/72 saw together for a reasonable price.
 
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