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Tree cutting skills. Be careful who you learn or take advise from

dik650

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Had a guy once get heated under the collar, declaring ’plunge cuts’ and ‘bore cuts’ were different things (one perpendicular to the grain, and one parallel to the grain). Any thoughts on that terminology?

Philbert
Did you argue?
 

dik650

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I later dug through a bunch of training manuals from USFS, and others, where I found the words used interchangeably.

Was mostly surprised at his angry reaction at the time. Some people get set in their ways.

Philbert

People fly off the handle a lot quicker now days so that's a good way to go.
You never know when someone is going to take things entirely too far.
 

Loony661

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I later dug through a bunch of training manuals from USFS, and others, where I found the words used interchangeably.

Was mostly surprised at his angry reaction at the time. Some people get set in their ways.

Philbert
I have always used both terms interchangeably as well.
 

dik650

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Plunge cutting sounds more specific. "I like to plunge cut." "I utilize the plunge cut"
"Go ahead & plunge the center out." That sounds wierd. But "bore" sounds more appropriate.
I prefer reaming.
 

dik650

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You’re lucky if they even face notch around here they usually just cut in half way then start on the other side and try to meet the cuts up.
Stumpjumping..
It actually is very effective in minimizing wood pull, but the only directional control you get is while the butt is rotating around the kerf before the holding wood pops.

It's easy to see if someone's cutting in such a manner from a far. The tree tops slowly meander one way or the other, then POP, & away they go.

I hate to say it, but it's darned handy when the sap is up & the stems NEED to go down the hill...

A stem can't chair when you've cut past the center. It might twist, or explode, but it won't throw out a big slab.
Thanks, cylinders.
 

davidwyby

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Is the one on the right a “coos bay” technique?
Need to clarify...triangle is not coos bay. Coos bay is even weirder. Cut both sides 1/3, then back cut. No face. There is more discussion about it on the treehouse forum.
 

davidwyby

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I don’t like short bars and bore cutting trees either, but after exposure to trees in various regions, Tan Oak and Bigleaf Maple, Eucalyptus, Black Ash and other west deciduous species don’t, generally, behave like east coast hardwoods. There is a huge difference between those species and others such as Shagbark Hickory, Red Oak, White Ash, and so on. Some species do overlap, Cottonwood/Tulip Poplar being a prime example. Sycamore can be found primarily from the east coast extending just into the plains states, but also in parts of California. West coast deciduous trees also generally grow taller and straighter than the trees found in most places east of the Mississippi river.

As far as checking for rot goes, that’s something that should be done one every tree. They can all hide something, and everybody who walks up to fell a tree meeds to be vigilant.

The numbers are regions of the U.S Forest Service. 6 is Oregon/Washington, 5 is California/Hawaii (but really just California), 8 is the Southeast region, 7 used to be a few states in the Northeast that were mountainous and cold in the winter, and 9 is the Eastern region, running from Minnesota/Iowa/Missouri to the Atlantic ocean north of the Ohio River. I’ve attached a region map.

Edited to… Uh…Maybe attach the image I said I did.
Would you say Eastern trees are mostly more prone to split/chair?

Thanks
 

Philbert

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Need to clarify...triangle is not coos bay. Coos bay is even weirder. Cut both sides 1/3, then back cut. No face. There is more discussion about it on the treehouse forum.
Seen a number of posts that identify the ‘Triangle Cut’ and ‘Coos Bay Cut’ as the same.

Can you post some sketches / diagrams to distinguish?

Thanks.

Philbert
 

davidwyby

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Seen a number of posts that identify the ‘Triangle Cut’ and ‘Coos Bay Cut’ as the same.

Can you post some sketches / diagrams to distinguish?

Thanks.

Philbert
 

pavel408

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Seen a number of posts that identify the ‘Triangle Cut’ and ‘Coos Bay Cut’ as the same.

Can you post some sketches / diagrams to distinguish?
cut.jpg

EDIT: Please correct me, if my picture of Coos Bay is wrong, I will update it!
 
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Chainmale

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These guys from Indonesia have a felling technique I hadn't seen before.
 
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