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Chainsaw to the rescue for bush trimming

livemusic

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Not a joke, I'm serious! Would a chainsaw be a decent tool for cutting Azalea flowering bushes? I have some in front of my main, wide front window at my house and over the decades, they have crept up with my hedge trimming such that they are just too tall, they are as tall as me. Which means they almost block the entire tall set of windows. I need to take them down a lot! Maybe half? I don't even know if they will grow back ok with that much trimming. The lower you go into the bush, the thicker the stalks. I don't think my Milwaukee battery hedge trimmer will handle it. They do routine trimming ok on them. I am not sure my old electric hedge trimmer will do it. Only other option I can think of beyond that is renting an ICE hedge trimmer from Home Depot, which are probably more powerful? Or use one of my chainsaws. What do you think? If chainsaw, a small one with smaller bar/chain or an ms462 with 24 inch bar/chain!
 

Wilhelm

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I have utilized chainsaws for brush clearing for decades.
Longer bar and at least half worn semi chisel chain helps keep unpleasantries at bay.
Though, proper PPE and common sense is a must.

My main "brush clearing" saw so far is my Dolmar PS-6400 (64cc) with 20" 3/8" B&C - too much power and rough chain.
I recently did some brush clearance with my Dolmar PS-460 (46cc) and 16" .325" B&C and it felt less violent.

I have cut back a s#!t load of hip rose for a neighbor this year - with all the thorns and endless branches I ended up using my Dolmar PS-7300 with 24" B&C setup, and still wished I had gone home to get the PS-9010 with 36" B&C.
Nasty stuff, yuck!!!

Cutting the stalk instead of the thinner branches is faster and safer.
Clearance Your access to the stalk with pruning shears, do one cut and remove the entire "crown" in one piece.

Be cautious, stay safe!
 

livemusic

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I have an ms362 that has a 20" carbide bar/chain on it. That actually needs sharpening. Wonder if that would be a good choice.

These bushes do not have thorns, thankfully. But, possibly some wasp nests!
 

Wilhelm

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I have an ms362 that has a 20" carbide bar/chain on it. That actually needs sharpening. Wonder if that would be a good choice.

These bushes do not have thorns, thankfully. But, possibly some wasp nests!
Dull carbide does not cut, it tears/rips!
Can You get a cheap chain for that saw local to You?
It would certainly perform better than a dull carbide chain.

Just a thought.

20" bar is fine if there are no thorns.

It won't matter what saw and B&C setup You use when it comes to wasps!
But adding oil to Your fuel mix may help keep them away from You - smoke screen!
 

Wilhelm

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Heck, just give it a try with that 362 & carbide chain! ;)
 

HumBurner

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.325 pitch
Advantages and disadvantages there. 3/8 holds up better when cutting in the dirt/rocks or dirty/dusty conditions. Generally is easier to file out metal damage as well, without sacrificing so much of the tooth compared to .325.



As others have said, OP, semi-chisel all the way.
 

heimannm

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I have not used any device like that, but I have an older version in the museum display that brought it to mind in this case. I do have some experience with the hedge trimmer attachment on my Ryobi/Troy Bilt trimmer power head and know that they do not work well when the stems are at all tough or woody.

Mark
 

David Boyd

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I have or had both the Stihl and Husky gas pole hedge trimmers. I am pretty sure they are a bit more robust that the Ryobi, but it still doesn't take too much to overwhelm them - 1/2" max on anything remotely woody and they are about done in.
For blackberry canes, smaller vines and such they can be very good, but swinging them around to cut thru brush can wear you out very quickly, especially if you are getting up there in seniority 😂.

PS Sorry for misspelling your first name.
Couldn't recall which way you spelled it.
 
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