Buy Used Saws CCC Ebay Store

Tree Felling Technique Thread

Discussion in 'Forestry Community' started by XP_Slinger, Feb 18, 2019.

  1. XP_Slinger

    XP_Slinger I like saws...sometimes

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Messages:
    5,000
    Likes Received:
    21,881
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Central NY
    Howdy fellow fellers,

    Didn’t see one so I thought it would be nice to have a thread dedicated to felling techniques. As I came to realize that felling trees for saw logs is wildly different than dropping them for firewood, I received A TON of valuable advice in another thread. I’m still learning a lot from those with more experience around here, it’s not only helping me produce higher quality logs, but also and more importantly keeping me safer as I am felling.

    So with all that said, post pics of your stumps, pretty or ugly. We all make mistakes and I think discussing what went wrong is how we truly learn.

    Here’s a couple of my latest. My big problem before these was keeping my bore cut level with the face cut. Recently learned the trick of nipping an inch of the outside of the hinge before starting the bore. I’ll try to find a video to illustrate.

    My own personal criticism is I left the hinge a little too fat and had to take a little more out after I had driven my wedges as far as I could. Both trees were felled 180* from their natural lean.

    E1AF9BE4-D5CA-4B40-A9AE-2D7F5EEA37CA.jpeg ED2D823B-4B20-4E35-A812-43B56C59E0AE.jpeg

    Here’s one that shows how bad I was at lining up bore cuts. Tree was down safe, but I wasted some of the butt log from fiber pull due to a hinge that was way too wide. This tree was big for me, 28” DBH, white ash.
    45013124-77BA-4828-8A45-9CD0B5108A83.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
    radio, blacksmith, chipper1 and 6 others like this.
  2. XP_Slinger

    XP_Slinger I like saws...sometimes

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Messages:
    5,000
    Likes Received:
    21,881
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Central NY
    This video shows what I’m talking about with “nipping the outside of the hinge from the face to get your bore cut level with the face. Lots of pros don’t need to do it but it helped me immensely. Practice practice practice. @J. Loe has helped me a lot.

    Makes the bore cut at the 1:10



     
  3. huskyboy

    huskyboy Sorta a Husqvarna guy.

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,749
    Likes Received:
    22,823
    Trophy Points:
    481
    Location:
    Ct
    That helps a lot and making sure the face notch is level. If it’s crooked, good luck lining up the back cut!
     
  4. huskyboy

    huskyboy Sorta a Husqvarna guy.

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,749
    Likes Received:
    22,823
    Trophy Points:
    481
    Location:
    Ct
    I think @TreeLife could have some experience to contribute
     
    J. Loe, RI Chevy, TreeLife and 2 others like this.
  5. XP_Slinger

    XP_Slinger I like saws...sometimes

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Messages:
    5,000
    Likes Received:
    21,881
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Central NY
    Exactly, hard to be flat with a crooked face. Good point Mason
     
  6. junkman

    junkman Crush it

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2016
    Messages:
    4,202
    Likes Received:
    16,214
    Trophy Points:
    446
    Location:
    pacific northwest
    with a longer bar makes it easier to line up your cuts .
     
  7. huskyboy

    huskyboy Sorta a Husqvarna guy.

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,749
    Likes Received:
    22,823
    Trophy Points:
    481
    Location:
    Ct
    Longer bars do make it easier to line up cuts. But east coast logging is different than west and not everything is interchangeable. 32-36” bar is almost useless here for logging the way we do it. Most of the time I like a 24/28 on a 70-90cc. Been doing a lot of 20” bar work lately though. Residential is the only time you really need a long bar for stumping or felling those fat yard trees here. Your gonna get a lot of varying opinions on this however.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
  8. Junk Meister

    Junk Meister Super OPE Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2016
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    278
    Trophy Points:
    108
    Location:
    Nebraska
    My logger friend does walnut. He most always bore cuts all the way through leaving the tree standing on the outside (I don't know the proper terminology)flare/buttress roots then nips them off with a vertical cut. No fiber pull but you don't always control where the tree lands.
     
    chipper1, Semotony, treesmith and 7 others like this.
  9. TreeLife

    TreeLife I like saws

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2017
    Messages:
    2,694
    Likes Received:
    11,008
    Trophy Points:
    368
    Location:
    Berkshire County, Massachusetts
    If you aren't harvesting for funds, make your box cut a little high to make it more comfortable to work and so you are less likely to get dirty debris in your cut. Alot of guys like to use 20" bars for falling, they have some false sense that it is for "production". I'd rather not waste my time doing multiple bore cuts and leaving things to mystery. 28"bar is my duty length bar, it reaches thru most timber here unless its monstrous, which in that case you are spending alot more time on your cuts regardless.

    Bottom cut should be parallel to the surface you are working on, if you are not using a Humboldt cut. Your top cut or angled cut depending on situation should be around 30% thru the trees diameter for the most hinge strength, especially if you are cutting a leaner.

    ALL OF THIS WILL BE FOR NAUGHT IF YOUR CHAIN IS NOT CUTTING STRAIGHT. Take the time to check your raker depth, top plate angles and gullet depth/consistency. This is the most important aspect of using a saw for actual felling.

    I'll try to post some pics if I can. All of this is of course my opinion and is subject to judgement and ridicule lol
     
    Farmchuck, chipper1, Semotony and 9 others like this.
  10. XP_Slinger

    XP_Slinger I like saws...sometimes

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Messages:
    5,000
    Likes Received:
    21,881
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Central NY
    Excellent point about a higher stump being easier to work with. I ran into my dificulties when trying to cut the stump low for saw logs, harder to see that flat line. In firewood it doesn’t matter, cut it high then flush off the stump for a nice block of firewood.

    I too have come to prefer a 28” bar and on my 288. Like you, a 28” goes through most of my trees with a few exceptions along the way. I also have come to prefer the power of a bigger saw while felling. Not for speed, but for control while setting the hinge or trigger. I also understand the utility of a wrap when felling, glad I have it now.
     
    Semotony, hseII, treesmith and 5 others like this.
  11. XP_Slinger

    XP_Slinger I like saws...sometimes

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Messages:
    5,000
    Likes Received:
    21,881
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Central NY
    I pulled these illustrations from another forum a month ago. Big thing here is not just knowing how to make these cuts, it’s more important imo that you know when to use them. Thankfully, these all have a brief description of when to use them. Only part that is grey to me is what is considered a “big heavy leaner” or a “small leaner” etc.. This is where experience and practice are key.

    2C3FCEB9-E437-42BB-9698-AD30F8DB2AE4.png C1F41A72-3BF7-45DE-B5DE-FECFD2ED4D26.png 07430383-7739-4467-9332-155BC297F2F8.png C5479848-7805-4DE9-97CE-5289F382869D.png D5F6C0DE-F97B-4C6E-AB41-E62B3CB798E0.png
     
  12. XP_Slinger

    XP_Slinger I like saws...sometimes

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Messages:
    5,000
    Likes Received:
    21,881
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Central NY
    A few more.

    06FE2EC2-67EB-4B36-82AB-27F843D9211C.png D14EBFB2-855C-4B25-8A76-77E6992E04AB.png 8E00BB3A-3FA5-4E44-80D6-4DDE9CD38850.png 59F8465D-A62E-4BD4-AB5E-0E6C80619CA0.png 5C6A028F-5F03-4FD7-86FB-2A9CD549CC17.png
     
    radio, AlfA01, blacksmith and 6 others like this.
  13. XP_Slinger

    XP_Slinger I like saws...sometimes

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Messages:
    5,000
    Likes Received:
    21,881
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Central NY
    If anyone with experience sees error in any of these methods please let me know and I’ll remove it. Wouldn’t want to put out bad info.
     
    Semotony, treesmith, Cat 525 and 2 others like this.
  14. XP_Slinger

    XP_Slinger I like saws...sometimes

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Messages:
    5,000
    Likes Received:
    21,881
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Central NY
    An overly cautious technique I use is no matter how sure I am of the trees willingness to go where I want it, I always set a wedge for insurance. Only time I don’t is if I’m felling to a prominant lean with a trigger. Wedges are a fellers best friend!!!!
     
    AlfA01, chipper1, Semotony and 5 others like this.
  15. beaglebriar

    beaglebriar Mastermind Approved!

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2016
    Messages:
    13,963
    Likes Received:
    70,775
    Trophy Points:
    549
    Location:
    Rome,PA
    I bore cut almost every tree. Face cut then bore halfway through at the hinge, walk the cut around to the back, bore in the other side until you feel it meet the first cut then walk that around. Drive a wedge here and there if necessary. Then cut the trigger/ holding wood. 90 percent of the time it works every time.
     
  16. huskyboy

    huskyboy Sorta a Husqvarna guy.

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,749
    Likes Received:
    22,823
    Trophy Points:
    481
    Location:
    Ct
    That’s what I do most of the time too
     
  17. XP_Slinger

    XP_Slinger I like saws...sometimes

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Messages:
    5,000
    Likes Received:
    21,881
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Central NY
    Yup that’s what I’m doing now. 10% of the time the wedges do 100% of the work:D
     
  18. RI Chevy

    RI Chevy DollyKitaStihlvarna Runner

    Joined:
    May 7, 2016
    Messages:
    18,504
    Likes Received:
    43,511
    Trophy Points:
    497
    Location:
    Ocean State
    I'm just a hacker. I never bore cut. I use traditional Humbolt cut and wedges. Just me. I also use rope if necessary to pull tree in direction if questionable.
    I use KISS principles.
     
  19. XP_Slinger

    XP_Slinger I like saws...sometimes

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2016
    Messages:
    5,000
    Likes Received:
    21,881
    Trophy Points:
    448
    Location:
    Central NY
    I’m a hacker too buddy. IMO since becoming more familiar I think a bore cut is actually safer than a straight back cut. Bore cutting let’s you set your hinge exactly how you want it as the tree rests calmly on the hinge and hold wood at the trigger. Insert wedges, set the trigger size, then cut the trigger. If it goes over, success. If it doesn’t your wedges have saved your ass and then allow you to move the tree with all the time in the world. Helps me remain focused as a newb cutting for saw logs. That tree doesn’t move until I want it to.

    Also almost completely eliminates the chance for a barber chair when felling a leaner.
     
  20. J. Loe

    J. Loe Pinnacle OPE Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2017
    Messages:
    381
    Likes Received:
    1,282
    Trophy Points:
    203
    Location:
    SE Wisconsin
    You’re making me blush.

    I’ll definitely contribute to this thread when my brain isn’t pulped from snow plowing.


    YAAAAAAAAA!
     
    chipper1, Semotony, treesmith and 4 others like this.
Loading...

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice