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KUDOS Snowblowers vs Chainsaws

Philbert

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Not too bad here: 8°F; only about an inch of dry, squeaky snow; light wind.

TORO snow thrower started up: first pull, with fresh gas, after sitting for 9 months! Gotta give them recognition.

Even my older Toro’s, with the Tecumseh, 2-cycle, engines, would start on the first or second pull, after seasonal storage.

As opposed to some chainsaws, after sitting just a day!

I remember when I first realized that my 2-cycle snow blowers did not even have air filters!!!

Did ‘old-school’ chainsaws start that easily?

Philbert
 
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Wilhelm

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4-stroke, larger cc engine?

I find that my walk behind mower starts easy no matter whether I used it yesterday or a couple months ago.
 

Philbert

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This has a Toro 4-cycle engine (4 HP).

I actually liked my older, Tecumseh 2-cycle (3 HP) powered Toro snow thrower better. Even though, technically, lower powered, and 2 inches narrower path.

It was lighter, simpler, and seemed to do the same amount of work. Although, I had to mix fuel, and it was probably louder.

Thought I was ‘upgrading’.

The newer version of my current machine is rated at 5 HP.

Philbert
 

Dub11

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Only thing I can think of that makes a difference is the carburetor style of the blower vs chainsaw "float bowl vs diaphragm" on the starting front. I have a mtd 319-180 it'll keep up throwing snow until the drifts are higher than the chute. Then it'll time for the 2 stage.
 

Philbert

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Only thing I can think of that makes a difference is the carburetor style of the blower vs chainsaw "float bowl vs diaphragm" on the starting front.
Good point.

Also wondered about ‘miniaturization’ and the EPA.

Size and weight are less important on a wheeled piece of equipment. Making them small includes a lot of tiny, circuitous, passageways. Maybe these clog easier?

And (not trying to be political here) if pollution standards hit one type of OPE before another, focusing on emissions, versus ease of starting.

Did the old, larger, Tillotson carburetors start easier?

Lower compression on snow throwers and lawnmowers?

‘Starting anxiety’ is one of the least pleasant parts of a 2-cycle chainsaw.

The only times I’ve ever used the (corded) electric start feature on my snow throwers, has been when the starting rope broke, and it was too cold outside to fix (a lot of screws to access recoil).

Philbert
 
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Dub11

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Good point.

Also wondered about ‘miniaturization’ and the EPA.

Size and weight are less important on a wheeled piece of equipment. Making them small includes a lot of tiny, circuitous, passageways. Maybe these clog easier?

And (not trying to be political here) if pollution standards hit one type of OPE before another, focusing on emissions, versus ease of starting.

Did the old, larger, Tillotson carburetors start easier?

Lower compression on snow throwers and lawnmowers?

‘Starting anxiety’ is one of the least pleasant parts of a 2-cycle chainsaw.

The only times I’ve ever used the (corded) electric start feature on my snow throwers, has been when the starting rope broke, and it was too cold outside to fix (a lot of screws to access recoil).

Philbert
I was just thinking more about this while clearing some snow lol.

The blowers are also running a constant rpm vs a saw, so maybe the blowers carbs is more simple having less passages and stuff since it won't be providing fuel over a wide rpm range?
 

Shane¹

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I think another overlooked thing is the flywheel and recoil. A saws recoil has to have limited size and saws need to be light. A snowblower has a weighted flywheel so when you pull it over it spins more times than a saw motor. Plus carburetor has a bowl with fuel already in it and a saw has to pump from a tank below the carburetor up to the carb.
 

Philbert

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I already ran out snow.
I live on a city block. Through the years, we have had sort of a friendly ‘competition’: first guy runs the block!

With very heavy or deep snow, the larger, 2-stage machines clear the bulk of it, and smaller machines, like mine, clean edges, down to the pavement, etc.

Philbert
 
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Wilhelm

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Only thing I can think of that makes a difference is the carburetor style of the blower vs chainsaw "float bowl vs diaphragm" on the starting front.

... carburetor has a bowl with fuel already in it and a saw has to pump from a tank below the carburetor up to the carb.

This is what I was getting at, well said!
 
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drf256

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Should make no difference. The float carb is certainly a simpler beast. No impulse or pump. Less and larger passages to get gunked up.

Most people ”winterize” or run dry their blowers. Saws dont have a shutoff valve between the tank and the carb. Maybe a microvalve wouldn’t be the worst idea on a saw.
 

r7000

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I wonder how good Li-ion battery powered saws work at -8°F
 

Philbert

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I wonder how good Li-ion battery powered saws work at -8°F
I’ve used mine down to 20°F. Had to thin the bar oil (no internal combustion to heat it up). Seen several ice carvers using them.

Same batteries are very popular with ice fishing augers. Several of my neighbors have Greenworks and Toro, battery-powered snow blowers, that they are happy with.

And, of course, we are now seeing battery-powered snowmobiles.

Philbert
 

Duce

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I’ve used mine down to 20°F. Had to thin the bar oil (no internal combustion to heat it up). Seen several ice carvers using them.

Same batteries are very popular with ice fishing augers. Several of my neighbors have Greenworks and Toro, battery-powered snow blowers, that they are happy with.

And, of course, we are now seeing battery-powered snowmobiles.

Philbert
Those battery powered snowmobiles are a joke, when I was into snowmobiling and know many who are. 25 mph is ridiculous, just buy snow shoes.
 

Duce

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Tesla has many problems still, over stated range, lack of reliable charging, list of range in cold climates. Heavy, Ford e150’s range is driving at 25mph. Snowmobiles are always operated in cold or sub-zero conditions. Can’t keep up with auto charging stations, doubt trail head charging stations will be a priority. Used to ride 250-400 miles a day, those where full days. Rode from Houghton lake to Munising, how many chargers and time would that take with a range of 30 miles best. Hand tools can be charged anywhere, not so with cars or snowmobile while traveling. @Philbert
 
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Philbert

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This thread was comparing 2-cycle and 4-strike snow thrower to 2-cycle chainsaw starting.

There are other threads on battery powerrd tools, OPE, and vehicles. Those would be a better place to debate those issues.

Philbert
 

blades

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two cycle each stroke is power , 4 cycle every other stroke is power. 4 cycle requires more mass to carry through to next power stroke. there were ( appear and disappear) 4 cycle chainsaws. Someone that remembers more than myself will have to get in the torque side of things.
 
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