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Tig welding

Discussion in 'Off Topic Area' started by kfd518, Jun 5, 2019.

  1. kfd518

    kfd518 Pinnacle OPE Member

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    I am looking to find some information about mild steel Tig welding. I know there are other forums on the web that deal with welding but I’m not a member and don’t want more forum memberships. I know there are plenty of GREAT welders here that have some of this knowledge and experience.

    I am using a tweco fabricator 211i lift tig with 17v air cooled torch no foot pedal in 2T mode.
    15cfh argon, 1/16 Ceriated tungsten 30*, #6 gas cup, 2 seconds downslope.

    1/16” carbon steel running 55 amps.

    Questions

    How far should my tungsten be ideally for butt welds, T joints? How far should the electrode standoff be?
    What size filler would be recommended by you more experienced guys?

    Not doing any structural welding just trying to get well penetrated welds with a nice appearance.

    Is it 100% necessary to regrind tungsten if you stick some how or get a smudge of base metal on the tip, if your arc is still showing nearly the same characteristics?
     
  2. Armbru84

    Armbru84 Here For The Long Haul!

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    Lots of good welders on here. I have a tig but still learning myself.
     
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  3. mdavlee

    mdavlee Hillbilly grinder

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    I use tungsten til it’s a green glow on carbon steel. If it’s still putting a nice arc out use it. Anyone can weld with sharp tungsten

    Amps is subject to speed and filler wire. I run 40 or so on my machine for mufflers with 3/32 and 35 with 1/16. Stick out is whatever you need to see around the cup and easily get to the base metal. With a larger cup 1/2-3/4” isn’t uncommon.
     
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  4. kfd518

    kfd518 Pinnacle OPE Member

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    Hah hah I did notice starts are so much easier when it’s fresh and sharp! I’ve also noticed it’s easier in general to lift straight up instead of tilting it off with the cup like I’ve seen in several videos.
     
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  5. Hall84

    Hall84 Well-Known OPE Member

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    For your start ups use your filler rod to start you arc. This way your tungsten never touches your work. Two things about doing it this way, saves the point on your tungsten. Second your tungsten will not break off and contaminate your work. If it’s not x-ray I myself wouldn’t worry about it if the welds still look good. But I will say the sharper your tungsten is the more control you will have with carrying the puddle on you filler rod. Unless you’re welding aluminum and then you want to use pure tungsten and have a blunt end on your tungsten and use a high-frequency a/c weld machine. On the butt welds that I do on pipe I use a back feed method. I use a 5/32 gap and free hand my root in on 90amps with er70s 1/8 wire. So in other words I look through the gap as I’m welding it, but that’s a different ball game. For just good penetration and nice looking welds I myself would use a 1/8 gap and use 3/32 filler wire. But everybody welds different buddy, that’s one thing I’ve learned as a welder. I’m not saying my way is the only way or the best it’s just what I do. Hope this helps..........practice makes perfect
     
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