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How do yall sharpen your mower blades?

Discussion in 'Mowers and More' started by 2000ssm6, May 5, 2018.

  1. ray benson

    ray benson Pinnacle OPE Member

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    A bench grinder if it needs lots of work. Otherwise a flat file.
     
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  2. Nutball

    Nutball Pinnacle OPE Member

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    Mine needed a lot of work. I started with a grinding wheel on an angle grinder, then went to 60 or 30 grit sand wheel.

    I've seen bench grinder type sharpeners specially meant for mower blades complete with a guard housing.
     
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  3. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper Super OPE Member

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    I just a plain old Bastard mill file on my blades.

    [​IMG]

    But I mow high enough I only need to touch them up once a couple days.
    Never under stood people scalping the roots of there darn grass and hitting rocks and roots of trees.

    :D Al
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2019
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  4. BGE541

    BGE541 Super OPE Member

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    Oregon belt grinder. About 40 seconds a blade, sharp and uniform every time.
     
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  5. Larry B

    Larry B Super OPE Member

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    One of my lawn service clients calls that golf coursing. He won't cut lower than 3 inches. If you don't water every other day like a golf course the turf won't tolerate the super short cut.
     
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  6. Spladle160

    Spladle160 Well-Known OPE Member

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    Lesco blade grinder. I can't imagine trying to remove the amount of material necessary to get a sharp edge and hold the angle on most blades I see by hand. Most blades i see get sharpened once or twice a season so I'd guesstimate about 40-50 hours of mowing at which point most have 2-3mm radius for an edge.
     
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  7. Nutball

    Nutball Pinnacle OPE Member

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    I find they go dull extremely fast. Obviously there's a point where it gets really bad at cutting, but it still surprised me a bit how fast it looses the really sharp edge. Bush hogs are worse, but they still cut even when "dull"
     
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  8. Al Smith

    Al Smith Pinnacle OPE Member

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    Now bush hogs are another thing .Those damned blades are 3/8-1/2" thick .You nearly have to take a cutting touch to them if they get really bad .Flails have about 80 swing blades and they are a pain in the butt too .
    The 54" Toro zero turn I have with a 23 HP Husqvarna engine can mow faster than what I did with a TO-20 Ferguson with a big bore engine and a 6 foot flail .A little over two acres an hour . It doesn't over heat like the Fergy did in high grass in hot weather .That extra 4-5 HP with the big bore kit over rode the radiator capacity .
     
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  9. Al Smith

    Al Smith Pinnacle OPE Member

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    In a former life with a former wife ,who kept the house I mowed a 5 acre field for an old lady down the road .About 4 times a season using a John-Deere model 70 gasser .Three feet high grass ,trailer type 6 feet bush hog . A model 70 has a large engine,over 400 cubic inch and loves gasoline ,like 4-5 gallons an hour under a heavy load .10 gallons of gasoline throwing fire two feet out of the stack .My ears would ring for hours after that ordeal .
     
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  10. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper Super OPE Member

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    I remove the mower blades after about 6 hours of mowing no more than 10.

    I also do not mow the dirt the roots grow in.

    :D Al
     
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  11. Larry B

    Larry B Super OPE Member

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    My customers like the super sharp edge i put on their blades. They don't realize that edge lasts maybe one mowing. Of course some blades look like they mow chain link fence and gravel piles. Had a lady a few years ago call and say something wrong with the new mower and the dealer wouldn't fix it and was mad at her. Long story short. New mower set too low and hit some pine stumps bending all 3 blades and breaking a spindle. Dealer brought her out a loaner while fixing blades and spindles and she did the same thing to the loaner. She could not understand why he was upset.:facepalm:
     
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  12. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper Super OPE Member

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    All you have to do is skip over the 160 pages of warnings, cautions and do not do's in the owners manual to get to the last 5 pages one of which explains how to raise the cutting depth of the deck.

    :D Al
     
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  13. Al Smith

    Al Smith Pinnacle OPE Member

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    I'm guilty of bending mower blades usually by hitting the roots of big oak trees in my yard .Toro high lifts are not the most robust blades made .After several episodes I've learned to slow down a bit trying to get as closes as I can to the trees .I do however have a set of Dixie chopper straight blades that had to be modified to fit the Toro which are very robust .They will plane a root off slick as a whistle .Probably a bit hard in the spindles though .
     
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  14. Al Smith

    Al Smith Pinnacle OPE Member

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    The first few times a year I set the blades at 4 inches .Mainly because of the leaves you just can't be rid of in the fall no many how many times you mulch or gather them .Oak trees drop them measured in tonnage .100 foot oaks have a bunch of them .After few go rounds I lower them to 3 inches .Seems to work out .
     
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  15. RI Chevy

    RI Chevy Stihlvarna Runner

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    I use those Oregon Gator G6 HD mulching blades. They cut everything.
    Heavy though.
     
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  16. Al Smith

    Al Smith Pinnacle OPE Member

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    I compare mower blades to straight razors and axes .A straight razor will split hairs but doesn't cut very long on manila rope before it dulls . An axe cuts for a long time before it gets dull but doesn't produce as clean of a cut .You take those broad axes they use in the timber sports things .You could shave with them and they do good for a few cuts in pine .Try that out on standing dead ash trees and see how that works out ,not too well .
     
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  17. RI Chevy

    RI Chevy Stihlvarna Runner

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    Lol. Very true. Most of the edge retention is based on the metal used and the heat treat process.
     
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  18. Al Smith

    Al Smith Pinnacle OPE Member

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    I'm old enough to remember when rotary mowers were a new thing on the market .The blades I think were recycled tin cans not too good,soft .Every so often they'd hit a rock or something and break the end off a blade which would wound somebody 40 feet away .They weren't too safe .In that aspect blades have improved over the years .They are about like spring steel these days .I've bent them but never broken them .
     
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  19. RI Chevy

    RI Chevy Stihlvarna Runner

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    I grew up cutting with a manual push rotary mower. Lol
    We had not enough money for fuel. That mower with those blades gave a good cut though.
     
  20. ucm931

    ucm931 Super OPE Member

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    80 grit flap wheel on an angle grinder then a cheapo blade balancer. The heavy grit helps prevent heating and ruining the temper on the blade. A light touch on the last pass with the 80 grit leaves a very decent finish in my opinion.
     
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