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Attachment for wood beam to concrete pads ?

Discussion in 'Construction' started by junkman, Jul 31, 2017.

  1. junkman

    junkman Crush it

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    Any good ideas for brackets for 8x8 upright beams to a 2 foot by 2 foot concrete pad i will be pouring ? there will be 12 pads and poles that need to be anchored to the concrete ,would rebar or a pipe stuck in the concrete and drill a hole in bottom of the beam be enough ? I really don't want to pay 80 bucks each for simpson anchors if possible . Need to do 12 mounting points .
     
  2. junkman

    junkman Crush it

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    I found these ideas over on forestry forum doing a google search ,the thing is going to be super heavy being timbers ,i cant see uplift being an issue ,but side to side sway maybe ,basicly a pole barn but not burying the poles and will have open sides ,just want the doug fir above ground to prevent rot ,

    http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=59571.0
     
  3. Rob Stafari

    Rob Stafari Pinnacle OPE Member

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    I've seen some intense storms blow through and move some really heavy stuff here, especially when you have a sail(roof) over top. I don't know the type of weather you have there, but here it wouldn't matter how heavy the timber if the right storm blew through. As far as the rot, the end grain of treated wood will rot here if placed directly on the concrete even in a 'dry' basement/area. That's the true benefit of the simpson anchors, it puts the wood up on metal with airflow underneath along with preventing uplift. Aside from fabricating some custom anchors/standoffs there is no other way I would do it here. For my jobs, it wouldn't make sense to make them as it would cost the customer more than buying premade in the end.
     
  4. woodtool89

    woodtool89 I'm a living regret

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    you can thansk me later

    I feel like I would want to bury a tie to hold the poast down on the rebar though
     
  5. Dustin4185

    Dustin4185 Super OPE Member

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    Let me start by saying I AM NOT A CONTRACTOR OR ENGINEER.

    I have done something similar in the past. Hindsight being 20/20, I would use Simpson plates. I used mild steel L brackets that stay rusty no matter how many times I paint them. I have also mortised the base and made a T bracket to slide in the mortise. I then drilled through the wood and steel to anchor. These were fabed from stainless 1/4 plate. It was a pain to drill and the posts split eventually at the holes. The posts sit on the heads of the anchor bolts.

    When I built an addition on a shed for my dog kennels I sucked it up and used Simpson plates for 6x6s.
     
  6. paragonbuilder

    paragonbuilder ONE OF THE GREATEST!

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    Missed this thread Brian...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. Dolmar Junkie

    Dolmar Junkie Not interested in rehab, just more Saws...

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    I have built something almost identical to what is pictured in your linked thread, with the exception being my materials were galvanized (leftover cellular tower parts)- I also built a set with the base being similar but the mounting provisions were external. The side facing the exterior had a 10"×6" plate welded to base plate opposite face had a 6"×6" plate attached to base allowing 5/8 all thread to be thru bolted at a height of 4 1/2" and on the exterior side 2 lags to be installed at about 8 1/2"( in hind sight lags probably not necessary/ if I did it again would probably make both plates same ht. and add extra thru bolt's) forgot to mention that I sprayed welds with spray gal. I only did this due to not wanting to pay for expensive factory anchors and I have a lot of galv. material. The first setup was adequate the second was the bomb, although once members were tied together no difference, but initially the first one with only a single connection point and 2 bolts allowed it to move (expected) but the second was very strong almost immovable for a post standing without upper connection or bracing.
    I wish I was closer I would give you a pile of galv. material if you decided to manufacture your own.
    The good setup is a little more than an hour from me at a friend's. We built a shelter to cover his Woodmizer me my planer.
    If I can get a chance pretty soon I will try to get a couple of pics,if not Maybe I can slap one together in the next day or so and stick a cut off in it for illustrative purposes.... Matt (that was confusing trying to explain it,so I know I need pics)
     
  8. Dolmar Junkie

    Dolmar Junkie Not interested in rehab, just more Saws...

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    I I forgot to throw in my disclaimer that I am not recommending this method only my experiences. My attempt at hillbilly Engineering.
     
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